Timecop (1994)

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Timecop (1994)

Post  BoG on Tue Apr 20, 2010 5:21 pm


JEAN-CLAUDE VAN DAMME in TIMECOP also starring
RON SILVER  Like a Star @ heaven  MIA SARA  Like a Star @ heaven BRUCE McGILL  Like a Star @ heaven GLORIA REUBEN  Like a Star @ heaven  Directed by PETER HYAMS

For me, this falls inferior to the best time travel films (THE TIME MACHINE; TIME AFTER TIME, etc.). As a Van Damme vehicle, it's typical. So, we end up with a rather generic action sci-fi piece, from my standpoint, some of it copying the tone of TERMINATOR 2 (1991), which probably influenced many sci-fi action films in the nineties.  It's not bad; it just doesn't rise above the mediocre.
I think the complexity which someone else may gleam from this is that it switches to different time periods: it starts with a short scene during the Civil War - a dreary one with gunfire. Then there are some scenes in 1994, when Van Damme's character loses his wife to paid assassins; then we switch to a scene in 1929 - the start of the Depression; and finally, to the future of 2004 (now, the past), when time travel is a reality to be regulated (by TEC, a new government agency - the Time Enforcement Commission).

I was amused by the efforts here to show futuristic automobiles - 2004 is now over a decade in the past; according to this film, we should all be driving tank-like vehicles now. I'd forgotten that this was based on a comic book; it shows - much of this is very simplistic.
One example of this simplicity is a statement made, offhand, near the beginning - a bureaucrat states that time travel to the future is not possible, because that hasn't happened yet. So, we're left with time travel to the past; we just have to accept this limitation and be done with it. Then, there's the warning that two identical objects cannot occupy the same space; i.e., two versions of the same person better not touch each other. However, a person who is 10 years older is not identical to his past self, is he? Also, even if a person physically touches another, aren't they still separated by molecule-sized space? Whatever.